Do we practice (or teach) what we preach? Developing a more inclusive learning environment to better prepare social work students for practice through improving the explorationof their different ethnicities within teaching, learning and assessment opportunities.

Hollinrake, Susan, Hunt, Garfield, Dix, Heidi and Wagner, Anja (2019) Do we practice (or teach) what we preach? Developing a more inclusive learning environment to better prepare social work students for practice through improving the explorationof their different ethnicities within teaching, learning and assessment opportunities. Social Work Education. pp. 1-22. ISSN 1470-1227

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Do we practice (or teach) what we preach Final published online 25.3.19.pdf - Accepted Version
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Abstract

Teaching experience at the University of Suffolk noted anecdotally that Black Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) students avoid discussing their identity, cultural heritage, norms and values, in lectures, tutor groups and in assignments.

To improve the integration of different cultural perspectives into the social work curriculum, we devised a small-scale qualitative research project Spring, 2017, to explore students’ views of teaching, learning and assessment about cultural norms and differences, seeking the views of both BAME students and white students on the programme in order to compare and contrast their experiences.

Focus groups were used to gather the views of BAME and white students about the opportunities and barriers to discussing identity, culture, and anti-racism. The findings raised significant issues, specifically about the barriers for both BAME and white students to considering cultural differences. Student perspectives suggest more sensitive approaches to considering cultural differences; more responsibility for white lecturers to explore white privilege and its impact; and more safe spaces to manage emotional responses to oppression to enable exchange of experience and learning about different cultural norms and values. The article analyses the findings, discussing ways forward to improve the student experience and promote good practice in teaching and learning.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: anti-racist practice, cultural diversity, social justice, student voice, good practice in social work education
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Arts, Business & Applied Social Science > Department of Applied Social Sciences
SWORD Depositor: Pub Router
Depositing User: Pub Router
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2019 09:04
Last Modified: 02 May 2019 13:22
URI: http://oars.uos.ac.uk/id/eprint/885

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