County lines: praxis for community safety practitioners

Andell, Paul (2019) County lines: praxis for community safety practitioners. Safer Communities. ISSN 1757-8043

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Abstract

County lines is a form of drug distribution which involves the exploitation of vulnerable children and young people by gangs. This new method of drug dis-tribution has been described as a bigger threat to vulnerable participants than the exploitation exposed by the Rotherham scandal (Times November 27 2017). The article explains the contingencies and drivers in the formation of gang identities in the irregular economy of drugs and makes some suggestions to address these factors. The article discusses the social reality (ontology) of English gangs and the different theories of knowledge used to understand them (epistemologies) that can both help and hamper gangs policy and prac-tices. The article sets out ideas for good community safety practice in order to develop multi-modal partnership interventions in gang affected neigh-bourhoods. The article locates recent policies within the broader political economy of crime and raises questions of current policy direction to achieve safer neighbourhoods.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: county Lines, community safety, gangs, gang policy, reflexivity, partnerships, gang interventions, action research, macro and micro social field, critical realism, moral economy, safer neighbourhoods
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Divisions: Faculty of Arts, Business & Applied Social Science > Department of Applied Social Sciences
Depositing User: David Upson-Dale
Date Deposited: 16 Jul 2019 07:45
Last Modified: 16 Aug 2019 01:38
URI: http://oars.uos.ac.uk/id/eprint/970

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