Effect of temperature on in vitro adhesion of potential fish probiotics.

Ibrahim, Fandi and Ouwehand, A.C and Salimen, S.J (2004) Effect of temperature on in vitro adhesion of potential fish probiotics. Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease, 16 (4). pp. 222-227. ISSN 0891-060X

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Abstract

As fish are poikilothermic animals, i.e. the temperature of their body is dependent on the external environment, we aimed to investigate the effect of temperature on the in vitro adhesive ability of potential fish probiotics. The tested strains were Bifidobacterium animalis Bb12, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. rhamnosus LC 705, L. rhamnosus LCR 1/83 and Enterococcus faecium M74. The in vitro adhesive ability of the five strains to two types of rainbow trout mucus (skin and intestinal mucus) was determined at temperatures ranging from 4°C to 25°C. Three of the tested strains, B. animalis Bb12, L. rhamnosus GG and L. rhamnosus LCR 1/83, showed high adhesion to both types of mucus at all temperatures studied (19–30% and 11–29% of the added bacteria to skin and intestinal mucus, respectively). The adhesive abilities of the remaining strains were low in comparison with the above-mentioned group at all temperatures tested (3–10% and 2–19% to skin and intestinal mucus, respectively). In the case of skin mucus, three strains showed significant differences in adhesion depending on the incubation temperature, while two strains exhibited significant temperature-related differences in adhesion to intestinal mucus. The quartic polynomial fit was the best model to describe the changes in the adhesive ability related to the temperature changes. In conclusion, in order to optimize probiotic functionality in aquaculture, the dose may have to be adjusted with regard to the water temperature.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: probiotics, rainbow trout, adhesion, intestinal, skin mucus
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Health & Science > Department of Science & Technology
Depositing User: David Upson-Dale
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2018 08:51
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2018 08:51
URI: http://oars.uos.ac.uk/id/eprint/570

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